Can Pregnant Women eat Fish? YES!

Once you find out you’re pregnant, it seems like there an unbelievable number of rules to follow, and you might wonder: “Can pregnant women eat fish?” While this topic has been the subject of great debate, as long as you eat the right kind of seafood products, eating fish while you are pregnant is perfectly acceptable—and even encouraged.

can-pregnant-women-eat-fish-200x300In fact, current research indicates that a better question than “can pregnant women eat fish?” would be “how much fish should pregnant women eat?”! The healthy Omega-3 fatty acids in fish not only help a baby’s growing brain, but the FDA has found that eating fish can help reduce the risk of preterm delivery, low birth rate, and even postpartum depression. The current FDA recommendation is that pregnant women eat an average of twelve ounces of cooked fish weekly.

Of course, the type of fish consumed is important. Can pregnant women eat fish that is raw or undercooked, or fish that is high in mercury? No, these are dangerous practices. Instead, pregnant women, and women who may become pregnant, should choose from a variety of fish that are low in mercury, including:

  • Shrimp
  • Sardines
  • Pollock
  • Catfish
  • Light tuna
  • Salmon

Salmon may be the superstar of fish, and when the question “can pregnant women eat fish?” refers to salmon, the answer is a resounding yes! As long as it’s cooked, salmon is an excellent choice for anyone, especially pregnant women. Choose Chinook (King), Keta, Silver, Humpy, or Red, and you will be doing yourself and your baby a favor by ingesting beneficial nutrients like DHA and EPA.

Can pregnant women eat fish? Absolutely! If you are expecting a new addition to your family, Morey’s Seafood can help you make the best seafood choices to help you and your little one stay happy and healthy, by providing tasty, responsibly sourced, and easy to prepare seafood. Visit the website for more information, including tasty recipes, or connect with the online community on Facebook and Twitter.